Good Omens: Crowley, Aziraphale – or?

24 Festive Tasks: Door 23 – Hogswatch, Task 4:

In Terry Pratchett’s and Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens, who do you root more for: Aziraphale or Crowley?  Or another character?  (And in each case: why?)

Oooh — Aziraphale and Crowley.  It’s very simple:

  • The eternal teenager inside me roots for Crowley.  I don’t think I’ll ever outgrow tall, dark and handsome bad boys who aren’t really bad at heart.
  • The book lover inside me roots for Aziraphale.  I mean, how could any book lover not root for the owner of a bookstore?

And of course, however slick I may find this year’s screen adaptation, there is absolutely no question that David Tennant and Martin Sheen are Crowley and Aziraphale.

Then again, by way of decidedly more than a side note, I also root for Agnes — far and away the most kick-ass of all the book’s female characters.

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/2016123/24-festive-tasks-door-23-hogswatch-task-4

 

Related Posts:
Good Omens Book Review
Good Omens Screen Adaptation Trailer
Good Omens Screen Adaptation Review

 

Narrativium: Where the Falling Angel Meets the Rising Ape
– Terry Pratchett and Discworld
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