Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman: Good Omens


Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman’s hilarious end-of-the-world spoof: Armageddon as foretold in the nice and accurate predictions of one Agnes Nutter, witch.  (Time of Armageddon: Next Saturday. Place: Tadfield, Oxfordshire.)  Starring one demon named CrawlyCrowley (who’s got just about enough of a spark of goodness inside him to be congenial company to one particular angel), one angel named Aziraphale (who deep down inside is just about enough of a bastard to get along like a house on fire with one particular demon), the Son of Satan (one Adam Young, 11 years old, resident of Tadfield) and his friends (think the Three Investigators and the Famous Five rolled into one; hellhound named Dog included), the Four Horsepersons of the Apocalypse (and the Hell’s Angels got nothing on ’em), a Witchfinder Sergeant and his Private (father and son Pulsifer … that’s -ssssifer with a sharp “ess”), and of course the aforementioned Agnes Nutter (the last witch burned in England, by the great-great-great-great-grandfather of the aforementioned Witchfinder Sergeant Pulsifer) and her great-great-great-great-great-granddaughter Anathema (also a resident of Tadfield), who will run into the aforementioned Witchfinder Private Pulsifer (Newt to those who aren’t into witchfinding) just in time before Armageddon rolls around; and last but not least a self-proclaimed medium named Madame Tracy.

Tremendous fun, and I’m glad I simultaneously treated myself to the book and its BBC full cast adaptation, which was broadcast as BBC 4’s 2014 Christmas Special!

 

Related Posts:
Good Omens Screen Adaptation Trailer
Good Omens Screen Adaptation Review
Good Omens: Favorite Characters

 

Narrativium: Where the Falling Angel Meets the Rising Ape
– Terry Pratchett and Discworld
Project Page
Reviews and Blog Posts

10 thoughts on “Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman: Good Omens

  1. I’ve seen the BBC adaptation is available on one of our accounts (Apple or Amazon Prime) but it’s a hard, hard sell to MT. He’s not a fantasy fan by any measure. But one of these days if we’re ever allowed to leave our house again, I’m going to watch it while he’s out. 😀

    1. Amazon Prime — they co-produced it, too, so it’s free for Prime members. I like the actual book quite a bit better than the screen adaptation (which is a bit too slick for me, all told), but I will confess I’ve been bingeing on the screen adaptation more than once in the recent-and-not-so-recent past regardless; and not just for Crowley and Aziraphale, either.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Cats Literature

Halloween Bingo 2021: Card, Spells, Markers and Book Pool

Phew!  I’ve had blog display issues for the better part of August due to a stupid WP plugin acting up (and of course, it was a plugin allegedly intended to “facilitate” the import of content into my chosen theme — haha, right), but luckily they were resolved just in time for Halloween Bingo! (Gosh … […]

Read More
Cats Literature Reviews

June 2021 and Mid-Year Reading Recap

Sigh.  Well, I think posting a monthly (and even half-year) reading recap a full three weeks into the next month has to be some sort of record, even for me, but here we are.  And I admit that at this point I’d even been contemplating holding off another week so as to combine this with […]

Read More
Literature Reviews

Dorothy L. Sayers: The Five Red Herrings

Dorothy L. Sayers is occasionally accused of having gotten too caught up in her research for a given book; and the two mysteries that routinely come up in this context are The Nine Tailors (bell ringing, published in 1934) and, well, The Five Red Herrings (1931), which, although chiefly concerned with fishing and painting, also […]

Read More
%d bloggers like this: