BL-opoly, Pandemic Edition – Eighth Roll

Eh.  I need some truly poetic sentiment by way of brain bleach after the solution of The Roman Hat Mystery

And since the dice just sent me to the Patagonian Star square for the third time in less than two weeks (even though as a compensation I did also get to collect the Race Car joker on the way), I’m going to use the “Cat” card I picked up in the last round to read whatever I feel like reading.  Or listening to — though even the very first words out of Crispin Redman’s mouth tell me that I am urgently going to need the print version of this book, too.  Not because of the quality of his reading, which is just fine as long as he sticks to English — but Patrick Leigh Fermor was fluent in German and lavishly quotes German poetry in the original in his books; including right at the beginning of Chapter 1 of Between the Woods and the Water … and it took me several rewinds to even have a rudimentary sense of what Redman thought he was reading butchering virtually beyond recognition.  (And I shudder to think of what he’s going to make of the Latin poetry, which Leigh Fermor also had a habit of lavishly quoting in the original.)  Anyway, off to Hungary and Romania we go!

 

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/2693017/bl-opoly-pandemic-edition-eighth-roll

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Literature Reviews

Anthony Berkeley: Murder in the Basement

This is middling Berkeley, not as problematic as The Wychford Poisoning Case or The Silk Stockings Murders, but OTOH also a fair way from the (mostly) enjoyable and intelligent writing that are The Poisoned Chocolates Case and Trial and Error. I rather like the setup — a body found by accident in a place where […]

Read More
Literature Reviews

Phoebe Atwood Taylor: The Cape Cod Mystery

The Appointment with Agatha group’s January 2022 side read: my first book by Atwood Taylor (though I’d heard her name before) and almost certainly not my last one. I’m not entirely sold on the main investigator, Asey Mayo; he comes across as rather too mannered and the book might have benefitted if the first person […]

Read More
Literature Reviews

Zora Neale Hurston: Dust Tracks on a Road

Definitely the best book I read during the first week of the new year; the New Yorker pretty much nailed it when calling the book “warm, witty, imaginative” and adding “This is a rich and winning book.” I’d (finally) read Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God last year; having now read her autobiography, I recongnize […]

Read More
%d bloggers like this: