The Flat Book Society: Open for July nominations!

Reblogged from: BrokenTune

 

Hello,

With the current Flat Book Society read of Napoleon’s Buttons (by Penny Le Couteur) on the way, I have cleared the list of votes to make way for new new nominations.

Please add any titles you’d like the group to vote on as the July group read.

And if you haven’t heard of our Flat Book Society and are intrigued, check it out! Everyone is welcome.

PLEASE DO NOT BE SHY!  If you want a title there, please add it – even if it’s been added and voted on before.

Huggins below links to the current list of nominations/votes.  

 

Note to group: Please remember this is a science book club and we try to stick with books whose primary subject matter is science. Not science fiction, history, or, politics etc. While there is absolutely nothing wrong with any of those subjects, they fall outside the agreed upon scope of this group.

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1894986/the-flat-book-society-open-for-july-nominations

 

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