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Ian Doescher: William Shakespeare’s Star Wars – Verily, a New Hope – Lioness at Large

Ian Doescher: William Shakespeare’s Star Wars – Verily, a New Hope

Verily, a Great Entertainment

 




“CHORUS:
As our scene to space, so deep and dark,
O’er your imagination we’ll hold sway.
For neither players nor the stage can mark
The great and mighty scene they must portray.
We ask you, let your keen mind’s eye be chief –
Think when we talk of starships, there they be.”

“LUKE:
Friends, rebels, starfighters, lend me your ears
Wish not we had a single fighter more,
If we are mark’d to die, we are enough
To make our planets proud. But should we win,
We fewer rebels share the greater fame.
We have all sacrific’d unto this cause.
[…]
For with the Force and bravery we win.
O! Great shall be the triumph of that hour
When Empire haughty, vast and powerful
Is fell’d by simple hands of rebels base,
Is shown the might of our good company!
And citizens in Bespin now abed,
Shall think themselves accurs’d they were not here.
For never shall rebellion see a time
More glori’us then our strong attack today!”


Well, of course Doescher channels the Bard’s great speeches, but this is not just parody (of either Shakespeare or Star Wars); it’s a cleverly-executed synthesis, transposing the complete screenplay(s) into Shakespearean iambic pentameter — and somehow managing to remain faithful to both.

I am glad that I opted for the audio version, though: Just as Shakespeare’s plays are best experienced in performance (and, well, George Lukas wrote movie scripts, not novels), Doescher’s synthesis of the two really comes to life when performed.  And I have to give huge kudos to the actors who, while they are clearly having more fun than should be permitted, take the work seriously and give it their full attention, all the way from R2-D2’s “beep, squeak, squeeeaak”s (Death of Rats, anyone?) and Han Solo’s “hey, I’m just here for the money” attitude to the weightier interactions between Obi-Wan, Luke, Leia, and Darth Vader.  (Interestingly, the total length of Doescher’s text also falls squarely within the average range of that of a Shakespearean play.)  I’m not one of those who can do Star Wars marathons, nor will I typically watch more than one play by the Bard at a time, so I don’t see myself bingeing on Doescher’s syntheses of the two sources. But I’m glad there is more than one of these — they just may turn out to be the things to turn to when my life needs a bit of brightening up.

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/2640779/verily-a-great-entertainment

 

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