Month: June 2016

Literature Movies Reviews

THE GRAPES OF WRATH

“I’ll be all aroun’ in the dark.” In 1936, John Steinbeck wrote a series of articles about the migrant workers driven to California from the Midwestern states after losing their homes in the throes of the depression: inclement weather, failed crops, land mortgaged to the hilt and finally taken over by banks and large corporations […]

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Literature Movies Reviews

SMILLA’S SENSE OF SNOW

Wintry Skies, Loneliness, and a Little Boy’s Mysterious Death How many words for “snow” do you know? In most languages, there is only one … or maybe a few, but not many different ones. But the Inuit language knows countless words for snow – different expressions based on its consistency, its aggregate state, on whether […]

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Literature Movies Reviews

A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE

Paper Moon As a playwright, Tennessee Williams was to the South what William Faulkner was as a fiction writer: a creative genius who revolutionized not only the region’s arts scene and literature but that of 20th century America as a whole, bringing a Southern voice to the forefront while addressing universally important themes, and influencing […]

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Blog Linked Items

Oldest handwritten documents in UK unearthed in London dig | Culture | The Guardian

  Early writings found under office block being cleared for new Bloomberg HQ give glimpse of Roman London Source: Oldest handwritten documents in UK unearthed in London dig | Culture | The Guardian Merken Merken Merken Merken

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Literature Movies Reviews

HOWARDS END

Homecomings Most of us connect the notion of “home” or “childhood home” with one particular place, that innocent paradise we have since had to give up and keep searching for forever after. In Ruth Wilcox’s world, Howards End is that place; the countryside house where she was born, where her family often returns to spend […]

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Literature Movies Reviews

THE AGE OF INNOCENCE

Love, Loneliness and the Strictures of Society. Imagine living in a world where life is governed by intricate rituals; a world “balanced so precariously that its harmony [can] be shattered by a whisper” (Wharton); a world ruled by self-declared experts on form, propriety and family history – read: scandal –; where everything is labeled and […]

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Literature Movies Reviews

THE MALTESE FALCON

The Birth of Hollywood’s Original Noir Anti-Hero Like few other actors, Humphrey Bogart ruled the Hollywood of the 1940s and 1950s – epitome of the handsome, cynical and oh-so lonesome wolf and looking unbeatably cool in his fedora and trenchcoat, a cigarette dangling from the corner of his mouth; endowed with a legendary aura several […]

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Literature Movies Reviews

THE BIG SLEEP

Murder, mystery and the magnetism of Bogart and Bacall They were one of Hollywood’s all-time legendary couples, both on screen and off; producing celluloid magic in the four films they made together between 1943 and 1948 as much as by their off-screen romance, which in itself was the stuff that dreams are made of. He […]

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Literature Movies Reviews

CASABLANCA

You must remember this … Aaaahhh … Bogey. AFI’s No. 1 film star of the 20th century. Hollywood’s original noir anti-hero, epitome of the handsome, cynical and oh-so lonesome wolf (with “Casablanca”‘s Rick Blaine alone, one of the Top 5 guys on the AFI’s list of greatest 20th century film heroes); looking unbeatably cool in […]

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Blog

“Continent Isolated”

Albeit apocryphal, this was the first English idiomatic expression I ever learned: The alleged 1930s newspaper headline “Heavy fog over the Channel: Continent Isolated.” – Not the British Isles, but Mainland Europe cut off. The person from whom I heard this was, of all people, my 5th grade English teacher, who professed to be an Anglophile […]

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Literature Reviews

Beryl Markham: West With the Night

A British African Amazon Taken to Kenya at age three, in 1905, Beryl Markham was raised on a farm by her father and a much-hated governess – her mother soon re-abandoned pioneer life for England. And while other girls were groomed to be ladies of society, she learned to ride and train horses, played with […]

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Blog Literature Music

A Playlist for Ian Rankin’s Inspector Rebus Series

      This moved from Tumblr to BookLikes, as part of the blogging challenge I’ve decided to call “Bookish Q&A 3: The Maxi Version” (you can find the complete Q&A in the “About” section of the sidebar to the right). One of my all-time favorite book series, Ian Rankin‘s Inspector Rebus series, seems tailor-made for this […]

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Literature Reviews

Sharon Maas: The Small Fortune of Dorothea Q.

Coming Home When Sharon Maas first made it known to her then-agent and then-editor that she was thinking about writing a book set in her native Guyana, she met with blank incomprehension and utter rejection: “Guyana? Whyever would anyone write about that little backwater country; a place nobody knows anything about and which probably at […]

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Literature Reviews

Astrid Lindgren: Pippi Longstocking / Leo Tolstoy: Anna Karenina

Well, one day I may well get around to writing proper reviews of Lindgren’s and Tolstoy’s books after all, too. But until then, quite unapologetically, my Goodreads Celebrity Death Match Review Elimination Tournament entry will have to do … Girl Power, or: Celebrity Death Match Review Elimination Tournament Review: Anna Karenina (12) vs. Pippi Långstrump […]

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Literature Reviews

Mark Twain: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn / Harper Lee: To Kill a Mockingbird

Well, one day I may well get around to writing proper reviews of these masterpieces after all, too. But until then, quite unapologetically, my Goodreads Celebrity Death Match Review Elimination Tournament entry will have to do … Huck Finn vs. Atticus Finch, or: Goodreads Celebrity Death Match Elimination Tournament Review – The Adventures of Huckleberry […]

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