Martin Edwards: The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books — Part 4: Chapters 16-24

Reading progress update:
357 of 357 pages.

Finished; full review to come as part of my next bingo update.  Right now, my head is still too much in a whirl, brimming with the names and information that Edwards has crammed into it.

The book’s final chapters explore specific topics and methods of narration pioneered by some of the classic crime writers: psychology — the forerunner of thrillers and suspense novels such as by Minette Walters, and Ruth Rendell in her Barbara Vine identity –, serial killer stories, inverted mysteries (think “Columbo”: you know whodunit; rather, the thrill lies in the cat-and-mouse game between the killer and the detective), and irony as a narrative method; as well as taking a look at some writers that, despite having published one successful crime novel, never wrote another (nicknamed “singletons”), as well as at the major early to mid-20th century represetatives of crime fiction in the U.S., on the European continent, and in South America (well, really just Argentina) and Japan; and finally, the books that stylistically built a bridge towards the crime writing of the second half of the 20th century, as well as today.

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Addendum:

The associated reading lists:

The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books & The Golden Age of Murder: List of all books referenced

The BookLikes Breakup:
The “100 Books” Presented

Overall Review of The Story of Classic Crime:
HERE
Reading Status Updates for the Other Sections:

98 of 357 pages
158 of 357 pages
219 of 357 pages

Other Books Mentioned:
Part 1: Chapters 1 – 5
Part 2: Chapters 6 & 7
Part 3: Chapters 8 – 10
Part 4: Chapters 11 – 15
Part 5: Chapters 16-20
Part 6: Chapters 21-24

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1601522/reading-progress-update-i-ve-read-357-out-of-357-pages

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